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Individual and Area-Based Socioeconomic Factors Associated With Dementia Incidence in England

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Psychiatry, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
152 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
147 Mendeley
Title
Individual and Area-Based Socioeconomic Factors Associated With Dementia Incidence in England
Published in
JAMA Psychiatry, July 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.1012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dorina Cadar, Camille Lassale, Hilary Davies, David J. Llewellyn, G. David Batty, Andrew Steptoe

Abstract

Lower educational attainment is associated with a higher risk of dementia. However, less clear is the extent to which other socioeconomic markers contribute to dementia risk. To examine the relationship of education, wealth, and area-based deprivation with the incidence of dementia over the last decade in England and investigate differences between people born in different periods. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a prospective cohort study that is representative of the English population, were used to investigate the associations between markers of socioeconomic status (wealth quintiles and the index of multiple deprivation) and dementia incidence. To investigate outcomes associated with age cohorts, 2 independent groups were derived using a median split (born between 1902-1925 and 1926-1943). Dementia as determined by physician diagnosis and the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly. A total of 6220 individuals aged 65 years and older enrolled in the study (median [interquartile range] age at baseline, 73.2 [68.1-78.3] years; 3410 [54.8%] female). Of these, 463 individuals (7.4%) had new cases of dementia ascertained in the 12 years between 2002-2003 and 2014-2015. In the cohort born between 1926 and 1943, the hazard of developing dementia was 1.68 times higher (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68 [95% CI, 1.05-2.86]) for those in the lowest wealth quintile compared with those in the highest quintile, independent of education, index of multiple deprivation, and health indicators. Higher hazards were also observed for those in the second-highest quintile of index of multiple deprivation (HR = 1.62 [95% CI, 1.06-2.46]) compared with those in the lowest (least deprived) quintile. In an English nationally representative sample, the incidence of dementia appeared to be socioeconomically patterned primarily by the level of wealth. This association was somewhat stronger for participants born in later years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 152 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 147 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Master 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 27 18%
Unknown 26 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 24%
Psychology 19 13%
Neuroscience 11 7%
Social Sciences 10 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Other 26 18%
Unknown 37 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 475. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2022.
All research outputs
#40,330
of 21,399,109 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Psychiatry
#109
of 2,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,162
of 298,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Psychiatry
#4
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,399,109 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,409 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 108.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.