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Concurrent and Longitudinal Contribution of Exposure to Bullying in Childhood to Mental Health

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Psychiatry, November 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
552 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
Title
Concurrent and Longitudinal Contribution of Exposure to Bullying in Childhood to Mental Health
Published in
JAMA Psychiatry, November 2017
DOI 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.2678
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy Singham, Essi Viding, Tabea Schoeler, Louise Arseneault, Angelica Ronald, Charlotte M. Cecil, Eamon McCrory, Frülhing Rijsdijk, Jean-Baptiste Pingault

Abstract

Exposure to bullying is associated with poor mental health. However, the degree to which observed associations reflect direct detrimental contributions of exposure to bullying to mental health remains uncertain, as noncausal relationships may arise from genetic and environmental confounding (eg, preexisting vulnerabilities). Determining to what extent exposure to bullying contributes to mental health is an important concern, with implications for primary and secondary interventions. To characterize the concurrent and longitudinal contribution of exposure to bullying to mental health in childhood and adolescence using a twin differences design to strengthen causal inference. Participants were drawn from the Twins Early Development Study, a population-based cohort recruited from population records of births in England and Wales between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 1996. Data collection took place when the participants were between 11 and 16 years of age from December 1, 2005, to January 31, 2013. Data analysis was conducted from January 1, 2016, to June 20, 2017. Participants completed the Multidimensional Peer-Victimization Scale at 11 and 14 years of age. Mental health assessments at 11 and 16 years of age included anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and impulsivity, inattention, conduct problems, and psychotic-like experiences (eg, paranoid thoughts or cognitive disorganization). The 11 108 twins included in the final sample (5894 girls and 5214 boys) were a mean age of 11.3 years at the first assessment and 16.3 years at the last assessment. The most stringent twin differences estimates (monozygotic) were consistent with causal contribution of exposure to bullying at 11 years to concurrent anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and impulsivity, inattention, and conduct problems. Effects decreased over time; that is, substantial concurrent contributions to anxiety (β = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.22-0.33) persisted for 2 years (β = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.04-0.20) but not 5 years. Direct contributions to paranoid thoughts and cognitive disorganization persisted for 5 years. This study is the largest to date to characterize the contribution of exposure to bullying in childhood to mental health using a twin differences design and multi-informant, multiscale data. Stringent evidence of the direct detrimental contribution of exposure to bullying in childhood to mental health is provided. Findings also suggest that childhood exposure to bullying may partly be viewed as a symptom of preexisting vulnerabilities. Finally, the dissipation of effects over time for many outcomes highlights the potential for resilience in children who were bullied. In addition to programs that aim to reduce exposure to bullying, interventions may benefit from addressing preexisting vulnerabilities and focus on resilience.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 552 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Student > Master 18 19%
Unspecified 14 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Other 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 44%
Unspecified 18 19%
Social Sciences 13 14%
Neuroscience 6 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Other 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 548. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2019.
All research outputs
#12,531
of 12,984,283 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Psychiatry
#51
of 1,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#623
of 273,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Psychiatry
#6
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,984,283 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,669 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 89.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,083 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.