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Early Addition of Topical Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Ophthalmology, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

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3 X users
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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Title
Early Addition of Topical Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis
Published in
JAMA Ophthalmology, June 2014
DOI 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.292
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn J. Ray, Muthiah Srinivasan, Jeena Mascarenhas, Revathi Rajaraman, Meenakshi Ravindran, David V. Glidden, Catherine E. Oldenburg, Catherine Q. Sun, Michael E. Zegans, Stephen D. McLeod, Nisha R. Acharya, Thomas M. Lietman

Abstract

IMPORTANCE Scarring from bacterial keratitis remains a leading cause of visual loss. OBJECTIVE To determine whether topical corticosteroids are beneficial as an adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis if given early in the course of infection. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial that overall found no effect of adding topical corticosteroids to topical moxifloxacin hydrochloride in bacterial keratitis. Here, we assess the timing of administration of corticosteroids in a subgroup analysis of the SCUT. We define earlier administration of corticosteroids (vs placebo) as addition after 2 to 3 days of topical antibiotics and later as addition after 4 or more days of topical antibiotics. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We assess the effect of topical corticosteroids (vs placebo) on 3-month best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in patients who received corticosteroids or placebo earlier vs later. Further analyses were performed for subgroups of patients with non-Nocardia keratitis and those with no topical antibiotic use before enrollment. RESULTS Patients treated with topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy within 2 to 3 days of antibiotic therapy had approximately 1-line better visual acuity at 3 months than did those given placebo (-0.11 logMAR; 95% CI, -0.20 to -0.02 logMAR; P = .01). In patients who had 4 or more days of antibiotic therapy before corticosteroid treatment, the effect was not significant; patients given corticosteroids had 1-line worse visual acuity at 3 months compared with those in the placebo group (0.10 logMAR; 95% CI, -0.02 to 0.23 logMAR; P = .14). Patients with non-Nocardia keratitis and those having no topical antibiotic use before the SCUT enrollment showed significant improvement in best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months if corticosteroids were administered earlier rather than later. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE There may be a benefit with adjunctive topical corticosteroids if application occurs earlier in the course of bacterial corneal ulcers.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Postgraduate 9 12%
Other 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 22 28%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Engineering 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 18 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2014.
All research outputs
#8,261,756
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Ophthalmology
#3,265
of 6,642 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,853
of 240,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Ophthalmology
#35
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,642 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,959 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.