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Association of Dual-Task Gait With Incident Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Neurology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
146 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
115 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
195 Mendeley
Title
Association of Dual-Task Gait With Incident Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment
Published in
JAMA Neurology, July 2017
DOI 10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.0643
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manuel M. Montero-Odasso, Yanina Sarquis-Adamson, Mark Speechley, Michael J. Borrie, Vladimir C. Hachinski, Jennie Wells, Patricia M. Riccio, Marcelo Schapira, Ervin Sejdic, Richard M. Camicioli, Robert Bartha, William E. McIlroy, Susan Muir-Hunter

Abstract

Gait performance is affected by neurodegeneration in aging and has the potential to be used as a clinical marker for progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. A dual-task gait test evaluating the cognitive-motor interface may predict dementia progression in older adults with MCI. To determine whether a dual-task gait test is associated with incident dementia in MCI. The Gait and Brain Study is an ongoing prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults that enrolled 112 older adults with MCI. Participants were followed up for 6 years, with biannual visits including neurologic, cognitive, and gait assessments. Data were collected from July 2007 to March 2016. Incident all-cause dementia was the main outcome measure, and single- and dual-task gait velocity and dual-task gait costs were the independent variables. A neuropsychological test battery was used to assess cognition. Gait velocity was recorded under single-task and 3 separate dual-task conditions using an electronic walkway. Dual-task gait cost was defined as the percentage change between single- and dual-task gait velocities: ([single-task gait velocity - dual-task gait velocity]/ single-task gait velocity) × 100. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association between risk of progression to dementia and the independent variables, adjusted for age, sex, education, comorbidities, and cognition. Among 112 study participants with MCI, mean (SD) age was 76.6 (6.9) years, 55 were women (49.1%), and 27 progressed to dementia (24.1%), with an incidence rate of 121 per 1000 person-years. Slow single-task gait velocity (<0.8 m/second) was not associated with progression to dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.41; 95% CI, 0.99-11.71; P = .05)while high dual-task gait cost while counting backward (HR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.57-9.15; P = .003) and naming animals (HR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.04-5.59; P = .04) were associated with dementia progression (incidence rate, 155 per 1000 person-years). The models remained robust after adjusting by baseline cognition except for dual-task gait cost when dichotomized. Dual-task gait is associated with progression to dementia in patients with MCI. Dual-task gait testing is easy to administer and may be used by clinicians to decide further biomarker testing, preventive strategies, and follow-up planning in patients with MCI. clinicaltrials.gov: NCT03020381.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 146 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 195 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 195 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 15%
Student > Master 21 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 8%
Student > Bachelor 12 6%
Other 36 18%
Unknown 46 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 30 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 14%
Psychology 21 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 8%
Engineering 11 6%
Other 28 14%
Unknown 61 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 196. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2020.
All research outputs
#99,057
of 16,292,814 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Neurology
#138
of 2,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,414
of 269,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Neurology
#7
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,292,814 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 57.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.