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Association of Midlife Cardiorespiratory Fitness With Incident Depression and Cardiovascular Death After Depression in Later Life

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Psychiatry, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
69 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
226 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
Title
Association of Midlife Cardiorespiratory Fitness With Incident Depression and Cardiovascular Death After Depression in Later Life
Published in
JAMA Psychiatry, September 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.1467
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin L. Willis, David Leonard, Carolyn E. Barlow, Scott B. Martin, Laura F. DeFina, Madhukar H. Trivedi

Abstract

Cardiorespiratory fitness (hereinafter referred to as fitness) as estimated by exercise testing is a modifiable risk factor independently associated with chronic diseases, cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, and mortality, but the association of fitness at midlife with incidence of later-life depression and the risk of CVD mortality after a depression diagnosis is unknown. To determine whether fitness measured in midlife would be inversely associated with later-life CVD mortality with antecedent depression. This retrospective cohort study at a single-center, community-based preventive medicine clinic was performed as part of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study. Data were collected from January 13, 1971, through December 31, 2009, and analyzed from October 6, 2015, through August 14, 2017. Participants included generally healthy men and women who presented for preventive medicine examinations at midlife and who were eligible for Medicare from 1999 to 2010. Those with a self-reported history of depression, myocardial infarction, or stroke at examination were excluded. Objective midlife fitness estimated from results of treadmill exercise testing. Depression diagnosis from Medicare claims files using established algorithms and CVD mortality from National Death Index records. A total of 17 989 participants (80.2% men) with a mean (SD) age of 50.0 (8.7) years were included. After 117 218 person-years of Medicare follow-up, 2701 depression diagnoses, 610 deaths due to CVD without prior depression, and 231 deaths due to CVD after depression were observed. A high level of fitness in midlife was associated with a 16% lower risk of depression (hazard ratio [HR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.74-0.95) compared with a low level of fitness. A high fitness level was also associated with a 61% lower risk of death due to CVD without depression (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.31-0.48) compared with a low level of fitness. After a diagnosis of depression, a high fitness level was associated with a 56% lower risk of death due to CVD (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.31-0.64) compared with a low fitness level. Midlife fitness is associated with a lower risk of later-life depression, CVD mortality, and CVD mortality after incident later-life depression. These findings suggest the importance of midlife fitness in primary prevention of depression and subsequent CVD mortality in older age and should encourage physicians to consider fitness and physical activity in promoting healthy aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 226 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 12%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 19 23%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 24%
Psychology 10 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Sports and Recreations 6 7%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 25 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 722. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2020.
All research outputs
#18,151
of 20,037,010 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Psychiatry
#60
of 2,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#464
of 294,455 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Psychiatry
#3
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,037,010 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,310 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 105.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,455 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.