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Multiple Myeloma and Its Precursor Disease Among Firefighters Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Oncology, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 1,309)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
96 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
80 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Multiple Myeloma and Its Precursor Disease Among Firefighters Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster
Published in
JAMA Oncology, April 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.0509
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ola Landgren, Rachel Zeig-Owens, Orsolya Giricz, David Goldfarb, Kaznouri Murata, Katie Thoren, Lakshmi Ramanathan, Malin Hultcrantz, Ahmet Dogan, George Nwankwo, Ulrich Steidl, Kith Pradhan, Charles B. Hall, Hillel W. Cohen, Nadia Jaber, Theresa Schwartz, Laura Crowley, Michael Crane, Shani Irby, Mayris P. Webber, Amit Verma, David J. Prezant

Abstract

The World Trade Center (WTC) attacks on September 11, 2001, created an unprecedented environmental exposure to known and suspected carcinogens suggested to increase the risk of multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is consistently preceded by the precursor states of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and light-chain MGUS, detectable in peripheral blood. To characterize WTC-exposed firefighters with a diagnosis of multiple myeloma and to conduct a screening study for MGUS and light-chain MGUS. Case series of multiple myeloma in firefighters diagnosed between September 11, 2001, and July 1, 2017, together with a seroprevalence study of MGUS in serum samples collected from Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) firefighters between December 2013 and October 2015. Participants included all WTC-exposed FDNY white, male firefighters with a confirmed physician diagnosis of multiple myeloma (n = 16) and WTC-exposed FDNY white male firefighters older than 50 years with available serum samples (n = 781). WTC exposure defined as rescue and/or recovery work at the WTC site between September 11, 2001, and July 25, 2002. Multiple myeloma case information, and age-adjusted and age-specific prevalence rates for overall MGUS (ie, MGUS and light-chain MGUS), MGUS, and light-chain MGUS. Sixteen WTC-exposed white male firefighters received a diagnosis of multiple myeloma after September 11, 2001; median age at diagnosis was 57 years (interquartile range, 50-68 years). Serum/urine monoclonal protein isotype/free light-chain data were available for 14 cases; 7 (50%) had light-chain multiple myeloma. In a subset of 7 patients, myeloma cells were assessed for CD20 expression; 5 (71%) were CD20 positive. In the screening study, we assayed peripheral blood from 781 WTC-exposed firefighters. The age-standardized prevalence rate of MGUS and light-chain MGUS combined was 7.63 per 100 persons (95% CI, 5.45-9.81), 1.8-fold higher than rates from the Olmsted County, Minnesota, white male reference population (relative rate, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.34-2.29). The age-standardized prevalence rate of light-chain MGUS was more than 3-fold higher than in the same reference population (relative rate, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.99-4.93). Environmental exposure to the WTC disaster site is associated with myeloma precursor disease (MGUS and light-chain MGUS) and may be a risk factor for the development of multiple myeloma at an earlier age, particularly the light-chain subtype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 80 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Researcher 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 63%
Unspecified 1 13%
Psychology 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 816. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,101
of 11,384,419 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Oncology
#12
of 1,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285
of 226,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Oncology
#1
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,384,419 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,309 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 83.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.