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Association of a Community Campaign for Better Beverage Choices With Beverage Purchases From Supermarkets

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
220 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Association of a Community Campaign for Better Beverage Choices With Beverage Purchases From Supermarkets
Published in
JAMA Internal Medicine, March 2017
DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.9650
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marlene B. Schwartz, Glenn E. Schneider, Yoon-Young Choi, Xun Li, Jennifer Harris, Tatiana Andreyeva, Maia Hyary, Nicolette Highsmith Vernick, Lawrence J. Appel

Abstract

Data are needed to evaluate community interventions to reduce consumption of sugary drinks. Supermarket sales data can be used for this purpose. To compare beverage sales in Howard County, Maryland (HC), with sales in comparison stores in a contiguous state before and during a 3-year campaign to reduce consumption of sugary beverages. This observational experiment with a control group included 15 HC supermarkets and 17 comparison supermarkets. Weekly beverage sales data at baseline (January 1 to December 31, 2012) and from campaign years 1 to 3 (January 1, 2013, through December 31, 2015) were analyzed. A difference-in-differences (DID) regression compared the volume sales per product per week in the HC and comparison stores, controlling for mean product price, competitor's product price, product size, weekly local temperature, and manufacturer. The campaign message was to reduce consumption of all sugary drinks. Television advertising, digital marketing, direct mail, outdoor advertising, social media, and earned media during the 3-year period created 17 million impressions. Community partners successfully advocated for public policies to encourage healthy beverage consumption in schools, child care, health care, and government settings. Sales were tracked of sugary drinks highlighted in the campaign, including regular soda, sports drinks, and fruit drinks. Sales of diet soda and 100% juice were also tracked. Sales data are expressed as mean fluid ounces sold per product, per store, per week. Regular soda sales in the 15 HC supermarkets decreased (-19.7%) from 2012 through 2015, whereas sales remained stable (0.8%) in the 17 comparison supermarkets (DID adjusted mean, -369 fl oz; 95% CI, -469 to -269 fl oz; P < .01). Fruit drink sales decreased (-15.3%) in HC stores and remained stable (-0.6%) in comparison stores (DID adjusted mean, -342 fl oz; 95% CI, -466 to -220 fl oz; P < .001). Sales of 100% juice decreased more in HC (-15.0%) than comparison (-2.1%) stores (DID mean, -576 fl oz; 95% CI, -776 to -375 fl oz; P < .001). Sales of sports drinks (-86.3 fl oz; 95% CI, -343.6 to 170.9 fl oz) and diet soda (-17.8 in HC stores vs -11.3 in comparison stores; DID adjusted mean, -78.9 fl oz; 95% CI, -182.1 to 24.4 fl oz) decreased in both communities, but the decreases were not significantly different between groups. A locally designed, multicomponent campaign to reduce consumption of sugary drinks was associated with an accelerated decrease in sales of regular soda, fruit drinks, and 100% juice. This policy-focused campaign provides a road map for other communities to reduce consumption of sugary drinks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 220 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 5 36%
Student > Master 4 29%
Other 2 14%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 29%
Social Sciences 4 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Unspecified 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 396. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2017.
All research outputs
#11,484
of 7,822,841 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Internal Medicine
#162
of 2,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,212
of 223,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Internal Medicine
#21
of 136 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,822,841 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,532 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 105.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 136 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.